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Menstrual Cup FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. I've tried using tampons and it didn't work - will I be able to use a menstrual cup? 
  2. I am a virgin! Can I use the menstrual cup?
  3. Won't it be very messy when I take the cup out to clean?
  4. Can the cup get stuck or lost inside?
  5. Will my vagina stretch from using a menstrual cup?
  6. Can I wear the cup to go swimming?
  7. Can I use the cup if I have an IUD?

1. I've tried using tampons and it didn't work - will I be able to use a menstrual cup? 

Yes! Tampons are usually made of rougher cotton/rayon material, so they tend to be harder to insert a menstrual cup. Once folded, the menstrual cup should be able to inserted smoothly and easily. 

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2. I am a virgin! Can I use the menstrual cup?

Yes! It may be daunting at first, but you can choose a smaller sized menstrual cup to start with or use a lubricant when inserting your cup.

Perhaps you, like many others, have grown up believing that the hymen is a seal that bursts or breaks when you have sexual intercourse for the first time. However, this is a widespread misunderstanding. Contrary to what many believe, the hymen is not a ‘seal’ inside the vagina that is punctured when having sex. If that was the case, girls wouldn’t be able to menstruate before they lose their virginity because there wouldn’t be an outlet for the menstrual flow.

In fact, the hymen is a thin piece of tissue that fully or partially covers the vagina – some girls are born without one completely. The hymen is gradually worn away with time by doing normal human activities including simple activities such as riding a bike or playing sports. Being a virgin is not defined by the state of your hymen.

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3. Won't it be very messy when I take the cup out to clean?

Not really. It might take some practicing the first few times, but once you're used to it, taking your cup out and emptying the contents into the toilet bowl should be a mess-free experience. As the menstrual cup only needs to be changed every 8-12 hours, you can time it so that you are changing it at home in the first few months before you gain confidence to change it outside of home.  

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4. Can the cup get stuck or lost inside?

No, it cannot. Even though the cup doesn’t have a string attached like a tampon, it will not get lost inside of you. It is possible for the cup to move up slightly, but it will ultimately move down by force of gravity.

If you have problems reaching the cup, the first thing to do is relax and breathe. If the menstrual cup has worked its way higher inside the vagina, its important to relax the muscles as tensing up will only make removing it more difficult. Check out our guide on how to remove a menstrual cup

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5. Will my vagina stretch from using a menstrual cup?

No, the vagina won’t stretch from using a menstrual cup. The vagina is pretty extraordinary in the sense that the muscle is able to stretch and go right back to its original shape – much like a rubber band. This means that something as small as a menstrual cup or a tampon will not cause it to stretch out. The main thing that causes the vagina to stretch is giving birth — a baby is much, much larger than a menstrual cup.

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6. Can I wear the cup to go swimming?

Yes, absolutely! The cup is fantastic if you have an active lifestyle, as it is leak-free and can contain more than 3 times as much as a super tampon. This means that you can swim, dive, run, or do yoga without a worry. The material of the cup is flexible, so once it's positioned correctly you won't feel a thing, giving you period protection for up to 12 hours at a time.

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7. Can I use the cup if I have an IUD?

The cup can be used with an IUD, but it is important to release the suction seal before removal. We recommend consulting with your gynecologist prior to use and if you just had your IUD fitted, you should wait at least 2 cycles before you start using a menstrual cup. Learn more.

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